Welcome to our Toy Shop.

As therapists, we are always looking for the best toys to motivate the children we see. Our toy selections are not random; they are selected carefully for your children and that is why, in the past, I have been called “Mary Poppins” and have been asked, “do you do children’s parties?”. So, we thought we’d put together our best Toys for Talking, Toys for Learning, and Toys for having Fun:

Parent Guide Books

Small talk book – simple ways to boost your child’s language skills from birth to 4 years

Zones of emotional regulation – for school children who struggle to control their emotions

Selective mutism – a resource book for parents and schools


Out of sync child – a parent guide for children who don’t fit in

Out of sync child has fun

Early Language Development

“Ready, Steady, Go” Games – putting some anticipation into a game can make it more fun and encourage more words… Ready Steady … … “Go” games are perfect for this; you say “ready steady…” and wait for the child to say or gesture “go”.

Pop up men

Frog in a box

First Words

Bedtime – a board book to help your child to say their first words

At the park – a board book to help your child to say their first words

Monkey and me - to help your child to say their first words

Funny faces sticker book – apart from familiar people, parts of the body are often the first words little babies understand.

Click clack track – the words you might encourage during this game are ‘car’, ‘go’, ‘down, down, down’ and ‘more’.

Ball run - the words you might encourage during this game are ‘ball’, ‘go’, ‘down, down, down’ and ‘more’.

Mirror – children love looking at themselves in the mirror. Encourage them to copy funny faces and silly sounds.





Peek a boo toy – children love anticipation games. Ready … steady … … (“go”).

Chatimal – a toy that copies the vocalisations your child makes has never been a more motivating way to encourage language

Cogs - the words you might encourage during this game are ‘cog’, ‘go’, ‘round and round’ and ‘more’.

Attention and Listening

Brain box – the child has to look at a picture and take in all the info., and then has to answer questions about the picture they were studying.

Brain box – the world


Where’s Wally? – your child cannot fail to be focused to find Wally in the pictures

Sound tracks listening – listening to and discriminating between sounds is very good listening training for the ear and encourages better attention and listening skills.

Listening lotto – listening to and discriminating between sounds is very good listening training for the ear and encourages better attention and listening skills.

Listening lotto – listening to and discriminating between sounds is very good listening training for the ear and encourages better attention and listening skills

Bop it – listening to ever-increasing complex sounds and words is excellent for improving attention and listening skills

Making Flashcard Work Fun

Words are best learnt within a context - e.g. going to a farm to learn the farm animals’ names - but sometimes this is completely impractical so we use flashcards to learn new words or sounds instead. Flashcards on their own can be fairly dull so we need games to spice them up. Here are the best games to use with flashcards.

Skittles

Pop up pirate

Monkeys on the tree

Building Vocabulary

Ensuring your child has a mass of single words that they can retrieve to use in their sentences is crucially important. We tend to teach words within their category so that they can be stored and then retrieved easily from your child’s language centre.



Shopping list game – food words









Hungry hippos – give your child a little tub and then say “names of … (category of your choice - e.g. animals)” and every time they say a word, they receive a marble to go into the hippo’s pond

Verbs – once a child has about 50 nouns, they start to join two words together. A good set of words to learn for joining 2 words together are verbs.

Actions matching game


Prepositions



 

Telling Stories / Narrative / Sentences

The ability to tell news and stories is very important for social skills. Here are some toys that will help.

Tell me a story



Story telling game



Story telling dice



What comes next



Guess who



Speech Sounds

Jolly phonics

Chairs for working on the ‘ch’ sound

S game for the ‘s’ sound

Snake pop up

Tongue twisters

Oro-Motor

Bubbles – blowing bubbles is thought to help the muscles of the mouth





Chewy tube – for children who are orally sensory seeking

Vibrating teether – for children who are orally sensory seeking

Conversations

Puppet – amazingly, some children feel less pressured when they talk to a toy than to a human being!

Conversation dice

Family conversations

Photo conversation cards

Speaker’s box

Language Development for Older Children

Articulate junior

Articulate

Don’t say it

Last word

5 second rule

Sort it out

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